Outstanding Women 2022: Jenny Provancher

Jenny Provancher has charted a steady course for The Equitable Bank in Wauwatosa, Wis., as it navigated a historical pandemic and a charter transformation. She has done so with an attention to detail and care for staff and customers which is truly exemplary, according to those who have worked with her. [Continue]

Outstanding Women 2022: Ashley O’Neal

As a child, Ashley O’Neal loved to count out the money her father brought home before he turned it over to her mother to pay the bills. When she was looking for a post-college career destination, however, she didn’t initially consider banking. The image she had of the industry was that of one dominated by white men, and it took a recruiter in college to nudge her toward taking a job at a bank. [Continue]

Outstanding Women 2022: Jamie Nelson

Jamie Nelson had been president and CEO of Farmers Security Bank in Washburn, N.D., for about a year when the bank’s owner, Jan Stroup, walked into her office one day in March of 2018 and made a simple announcement: “I’d like to sell you the bank.” [Continue]

The art of a penny saved

Katherine Kierland Herberger began to collect coin banks after buying one as a gift for her son’s birthday. Over the course of the next half century, she assembled a vast collection of both mechanical and still coin banks spanning more than two centuries; in all she had 277 mechanical banks and 812 still banks. [Continue]

Rising Stars 2022: Savanna Hendrickson

When The Bank of Tioga President David Grubb hired Savanna Hendrickson in 2015, he wasn’t necessarily looking for his successor. But over a half-dozen years, Hendrickson has proven herself through a willingness to tackle — and conquer — new challenges. Hendrickson, who’s been president of the $331 million North Dakota bank since the beginning of this year, is one of eight bankers recognized by BankBeat as a 2022 “Rising Star in Banking.” [Continue]

Rising Stars 2022: Aaron Siegle

When First Resource Bank celebrated crossing the $300 million asset mark last year, President Aaron Siegle gave each employee $300. The money came with a condition: Half had to be spent on the employees’ families and half had to go to a cause, whether a formal nonprofit or simply a neighbor in need. The success of the Lino Lakes, Minn., bank was built on the success of its people and its community, and the fruits of that success should be shared. [Continue]

Rising Stars 2022: Kevin Forristall

When considering a community banking career, most people would do their research, maybe take a class or two, or talk to a lender or analyst. But cold-calling the head of your local institution? That’s the strategy Kevin Forristall opted for when he was considering a move from Wells Fargo to a smaller bank. He’d found the bigger company a less than ideal fit, but stuck it out for two years learning as much as he could.  [Continue]

Amazing Outside Directors 2022: Marcia Malzahn

On the northern side of the Minneapolis suburbs, Village Bank is building a community: Employees and customers alike are invited to partake in building something a little more personal. Lending a guiding hand is banking consultant and former banker Marcia Malzahn, who has been on the board for just under three years and a part of the local community banking industry much longer. [Continue]

Outstanding Women 2021: Anita Drentlaw

Just before the pandemic struck, Anita Drentlaw began overhauling the culture at New Market Bank. As president and CEO of the bank, Drentlaw wanted to develop a commitment to leadership at the $190 million bank, located on the south side of the Twin Cities metro. Developed by an ex-Marine, the program she implemented at the Elko Market Bank focused on creating a leadership mentality among its graduates rather than situation-specific training. It’s helped create a unified culture with buy-in from all participants. [Continue]

Outstanding Women 2021: Tammy Sexton

When the Cambridge, Neb., branch of First Central Bank McCook caught fire early one Sunday morning in June 2016, it could have turned into a crippling event. Instead, up stepped branch president Tammy Sexton, who promptly dug into the to-do list getting a temporary branch set up. That facility, initially held in a community center meeting room, was up and running by Monday afternoon, less than 48 hours after the start of the fire. [Continue]