State Meetings

An elevated customer experience is a way to differentiate

Satisfied customers are loyalty neutral and will leave one bank for another when offered an elevated customer experience, said C. Richard Weylman, author of “The Power of Why” and “Start with Why.” Weylman, speaking at the Nebraska Bankers Association’s annual convention May 3 in Omaha, Neb., offered bankers practical steps to connect with customers they way top retailers do. [Continue]

In Nebraska, association works to stem industry brain drain

In his annual association report, Richard Baier, president and CEO of the Nebraska Bankers Association since 2014, talked about the viability of an industry that faces a talent shortage. In recent months, Baier said the association held its first ever Young Bankers Day at the Capitol and 15 bankers attended. “It was refreshing to see these people,” Baier said. “We will continue to engage the next generation” and get them involved in the donating to the PAC.  [Continue]

Iowa regulator updates industry, touts succession planning

Though 96 percent of the 275 state chartered banks in Iowa have a CAMELS rating of 1 or 2, there’s been a slight increase in the number of 3-rated banks in Iowa in the past two years. “You may think this increase is expected because of the current ag environment,” said Ron Hansen, Superintendent of Banking for Iowa. “I would tell you it’s as much caused by a decrease in the management component of the CAMELS rating as it has been by the asset quality component.” [Continue]

CBAI bolsters policy independence, urges reg relief effort

With a vote of the membership, the Community Bankers Association of Illinois strengthened its resolve against a merger with another banking association. The vote took place during CBAI’s annual convention at the Crowne Plaza hotel in Springfield, Ill., Sept. 14-16. The CBAI unanimously approved an amendment to its constitution making it significantly more difficult to change association policy on bank structure or to merge with another association.

Previously, only 60 percent of the member banks in attendance needed to approve any change, but the amendment raised that figure to 80 percent. Proposed changes to matters of policy consistent with CBAI precedents still need only 60 percent approval.

“It elevates the threshold on issues of that magnitude,” outgoing CBAI President Bob Wingert said, leading the final convention of his 43-year career. “In other words, there has to be a meaningful consensus to take that course of action.” [Continue]